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The sung biography of France Bellemare

france-bellemare-montre-quelle-pasFrance Bellemare was responsible for starting the concert season of the musical Camp Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, a mission which it fulfilled brilliantly Wednesday night with the assistance of pianist Jean-Francois Mailloux. The original soprano Saint-Felicien has shown that it was not a great voice, but a vibrant personality, the kind that knows how to communicate the pleasure that music.

Wishing to present his favorites, the young woman did not merely align tunes that are familiar. Through his confidences, anecdotes supporting the choice of a particular room, she allowed the public to know better. He now knows why she sings and what people have counted in his life.

If we start by the end, more specifically by the recall, is one of the idols of his father, Luis Mariano, which appears in the unlikely role model. “I discovered what it is like an operatic voice,” said Bellemare France by inviting people to support its Rossignol interpretation of my loves. Many have answered the call, especially women, and the whole room was bathed in an ocean of bliss.

Another person dear to the heart of the soprano Helene Fortin, his professor at the Quebec Conservatory of Music. One felt moved by evoking the bubbly personality of this woman too soon gone. To awaken memories, she resumed a learned piece by his side, Air jewelery Gounod. His playful interpretation brought out the personality of Margaret, the casserole a coquette strand subjected to temptation exerted by a full cassette of large stones.

A concert is also the time to satisfy an ambition that will have no chance to materialize at the opera, mentioned France Bellemare. So it’s Porgy and Bess, Gershwin’s work on the life of a black community in the southern United States. Too white to be part of the distribution, the soprano was pleased by delivering a version of Summertime full of feeling, including the final climb where beams lamele glued supporting the roof were tested for it.

Two other titles were shown the Jeannoise’s ability to express his talent in a different register of classic. In a curtain raiser, it has proposed an interpretation of life in nicely stamped pink mannerisms of Piaf. The text took a shot of freshness, which was also the case for Over The Rainbow, the final song before the recall.

What emerged, this time, it is faith in better days that the young woman expressed a light voice. It was not a Hollywood success could be heard, but a message of hope. She herself mentioned a balm to the heart, a term that could be extended to all of this concert heralding a pretty nice summer on the heights of Metabetchouan-Lac-a-la-Croix.

France Bellemare concert was preceded by a tribute to the former president of the Music Camp Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, Bernard Angers. It was then formalized the decision of the board to give his name to the Pavilion for the Performing Arts.

As recalled his successor, Daniel Bouchard, Bernard Angers was the initiator and motor of the major fundraising campaign conducted there about ten years to modernize the infrastructure, particularly the building which now perpetuates his memory. “The goal was to $ 500,000 and thanks to him, it was restored to $ 800,000,” the president said.

The secretary general of UQAC, Martin Cote, also praised the builder qualities of him who was his boss. Under his leadership as president, the educational institution has seen from the earth lodges of Humanities, Arts, the Icing and Forestry, and three student residences.

The most felt testimony, however, mix of humor and emotion, was the one delivered by the wife of Bernard Angers, Monique Caron. She said child, the Jonquiérois would have liked to follow music lessons, an ambition that could meet his parents who were of modest means.

Naturally, the future president of the Camp musical became a music lover in adulthood. Its powerful stereo, able to shake the walls of the family home, reverberated to the sound of military marches and romantic repertoire that accompanied him until his death in February.

We also learned that he had taken music lessons, finally, but his busy schedule prevented him from going after this experience. Not frustrated for two pennies, Bernard Angers has lulled piano music which was playing his wife, a happiness that even arrived at that time of life when the shadows lengthen, never lacks.

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